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George Floyd protest live updates: Cities brace as demonstrations continue across US

The death of George Floyd, a black man who died on Memorial Day after he was pinned down by a white Minnesota police officer, has sparked outrage and protests in Minneapolis and across the United States.

The National Guard has been activated in Washington, D.C., and 17 states: Colorado, Georgia, Kentucky, Minnesota, Ohio, Tennessee, Texas, Washington, Wisconsin, Utah, North Dakota, California, Missouri, Virginia, Kansas, Illinois and Nevada.

Police have made nearly 1,700 arrests across 22 U.S. cities since Thursday.

Curfews are in effect in cities including Minnesota, San Francisco, Portland, Cincinnati, Atlanta, Kansas City, and Washington, D.C.

In the wake of Floyd's death, murder and manslaughter charges have been filed against Derek Chauvin, the officer who prosecutors say held his knee on Floyd's neck for nearly nine minutes. Chauvin and the other three officers at the scene have been fired. The Department of Justice is investigating.

Latest news:

  • Protests continue in Minneapolis, NYC, LA, DC, elsewhere
  • Beverly Hills issues curfew, LA County declares state of emergency
  • At least 155 arrested overnight in Minnesota
  • Denver police looking for driver who struck cop car, injuring 4

    This story is being updated throughout the day. Please check back for updates. All times Eastern.

    The cities of Minneapolis, Atlanta and Louisville, as well as the Missouri cities of Kansas City and Ferguson, as well as Miami-Dade County in Florida, are under curfew as of 9 p.m.

    Washington, D.C., Mayor Muriel Bowser announced a curfew for 11 p.m. after not ordering one Saturday.

    "We know that the people who were destructive last night are not likely curfew followers," she said at a press briefing Sunday.

    The driver of a tanker truck is in custody after he plowed his tractor-trailer into a crowd of protesters on a Minnesota highway.

    Gov. Tim Waltz quoted reports saying multiple protesters were treated for injuries after the truck barreled through protesters on I-35W, which was closed to vehicular traffic.

    "A horrifying image on our television -- a semi ... with a flammable or toxic substance going full force into a crowd of peaceful protesters," Walz said.

    Authorities said they don't yet know the driver's motives.

    After nearly two months without tourists due to COVID-19 social distancing guidelines, New York City's Times Square is jammed with demonstrators. Protesters made their way to the area from Bryant Park for the city's fourth night of protests over George Floyd's death. Mayor Bill de Blasio said he wasn't considering a curfew following clashes between demonstrators and police Saturday night.

    Demonstrators are marching for a sixth night of protest in Minneapolis, where Floyd died. The Minnesota National Guard announced earlier Sunday that more than 5,000 soldiers and airmen were activated in the Twin Cities.

    In Boston, hundreds of protesters marched to Boston Police Headquarters for a prayer service. A separate protest made its way toward the Massachusetts State House.

    Thousands were also gathered near the White House in Washington, D.C., with other protests ongoing in Miami, Fort Lauderdale, and Santa Monica, California.

    Speaking at a rally in support of George Floyd, Houston Police Chief Art Acevedo said he wants to give Floyd's funeral a police escort when Floyd's body arrives in Texas for burial.

    Floyd, a Houston native, will be laid to rest there following his death Monday in Minneapolis.

    "Give us that honor," Acevedo said.

    Houston Police will use a high level of security to transport Floyd's body, comparable to when an officer dies in line of duty, Acevedo said.

    FBI bomb technicians found an explosive device in a vandalized auto parts store in Minneapolis on Saturday, the bureau announced.

    The FBI alerted law enforcement agencies about the discovery, which it said was a possible incendiary transfer device.

    The device contained paraffin oil and an unidentified black liquid, the FBI said.

    The owner and employees of the business, which was vandalized on Friday, did not know about the bomb, according to the bureau.

    Police in Richmond, Virginia, are investigating a shooting that took place around 1 a.m. during the overnight protests.

    A man suffered a life-threatening gunshot wound when the car he was riding in came in contact with a group of protesters.

    Detectives have determined the gunshots came from behind the car. There is no suspect description at this time and the investigation is ongoing.

    Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam declared a state of emergency on Sunday.

    "I acknowledge each of the voices crying out for justice and healing across the United States and in our Commonwealth. I affirm the deep concerns from the black community," Northam said. "As Governor of Virginia, I call on all Virginians to join together and build a renewed commitment to working for justice and fair treatment."

    A curfew in Richmond has been extended through Wednesday. Residents must stay in their homes from 8 p.m. to 6 a.m.

    A state of emergency was declared in Los Angeles County in the wake of the widespread protests overnight, which included looting and spray painting.

    The proclamation said the numerous acts of violence pose "extreme peril" to people and property.

    "If you are assembling to protest, please do so peacefully and with respect for all those who are suffering," Board of Supervisors Chair Kathryn Barger said in a statement.

    In Beverly Hills, officials on Sunday issued two curfews: the first is in the city's business district -- which includes Rodeo Drive -- and lasts from 1 p.m. on Sunday to 5:30 a.m. on Monday. The second curfew is citywide from 4 p.m. Sunday to 5:30 a.m. Monday.

    "Violence, looting, and vandalism will not be tolerated in our city," Beverly Hills Mayor Lester Friedman said. "It’s unfortunate that the message of the peaceful protesters has been diminished by criminal behavior."

    "We encourage all of our residents to remain at home," Friedman said.

    The Los Angeles Police Department earlier issued a mandatory curfew from 8 p.m. to 5:30 a.m. for the entire city.

    Protests in Philadelphia turned violent on Saturday. Fires were set -- including on police cars -- and stores were looted through the night.

    Mayor Jim Kenney said Saturday night's "destruction" "disappointed me beyond words."

    "I'm sure it saddened every Philadelphian who takes pride in our city -- especially the thousands of Philadelphians who came out earlier in the day yesterday to peacefully yet forcefully protest," he said Sunday. "They made a tremendous statement about their decades of anger over a system that degrades black Americans because of the color of their skin. That statement was important. And it in no way should be diminished by other organized groups of people who tried to cause chaos in our city."

    "Those vandals in Center City did a great disservice to the many others who chose to speak out forcefully against institutional racism and violence at the hands of police," Kenney continued. "In looting downtown, these individuals not only desecrated private businesses, they also desecrated the important message that was heard in the earlier, peaceful protests."

    The Ben Franklin Bridge and all streets in Center City Philadelphia have been shut down for cleaning, officials said, according to ABC Philadelphia station WPVI.

    A citywide curfew is in effect from 6 p.m. to 6 a.m., during which time residents can only leave their homes to go to work at an essential business, get medical attention or get police help.

    Retail businesses have been ordered to close immediately and any business owners or residents cleaning up vandalized stores must finish by 5 p.m., officials said.

    At least 155 people were arrested Saturday and overnight in Minnesota, the epicenter of the protests -- and that number is expected to rise as jails book suspects, authorities said.

    Arrests ranged from rioting to weapons violations to curfew violations.

    AR-15s were among the 12 guns confiscated from protesters, officials said.

    Cars without any license plates or lights drove through communities, and when they were pulled over, drivers fled on foot, officials said.

    One officer was shot at but was not hit, officials said. The two people in the car from which the shot was fired were arrested and an AR-15 was recovered in that case, officials said.

    Authorities shutdown major freeways in the city and closed off key routes between Minneapolis and St. Paul to prevent groups from moving between the two cities. A police line blocked the Ford Parkway Bridge.

    About 40 minutes after Saturday's 8 p.m. curfew began, riot police seemed to appear from every direction, dozens coming off of city buses and deploying flashbangs and tear gas.

    But unlike the violent protests in Minneapolis earlier in the week, Saturday night did not see fires set, looting or destruction of property, police said.

    The curfew and freeway closings will be extended into Sunday night, Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz said. All transit service in Minneapolis is suspended through at least Monday.

    At a Sunday press conference, Walz said he's proud of Minnesota's accomplishments, and that the state ranks second to Hawaii for happiness -- but only for Minnesota's white residents.

    "You cannot continue to say you're a great place to live if your neighbor, because of the color of their skin, doesn't have that same opportunity," Walz said.

    Floyd's family has asked Walz to let Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison prosecute the case, the governor said. No decision has been made, he added.

    Walz said rapper Jay-Z called him to discuss the protests and brought up his concern about hoping the prosecution will move forward fairly.

    "It wasn't Jay-Z, international, you know, celebrity ... it was a dad, and quite honestly, a black man whose visceral pain" was clear, the governor said.

    "He was passionate, he was gracious," Walz said. "He knows that the world is watching how Minnesota handles this" and that that'll have "an impact across the country."

    3 p.m.: DC mayor pleads, 'we do not want our city to be destroyed'

    Seventeen people were arrested overnight in Washington, D.C., police said. The U.S. Secret Service said it made one arrest overnight after protesters tried to knock over security barriers and vandalized six Secret Service cars.

    The National Park Service is reporting vandalism to historic sites around the National Mall.

    The night prior, more than 60 Secret Service personnel were injured from thrown bricks, rocks, bottles and fireworks, officials said.

    "Secret Service personnel were also directly physically assaulted as they were kicked, punched, and exposed to bodily fluids," the Secret Service said. "A total of 11 injured employees were transported to a local hospital and treated for non-life threatening injuries."

    "No individuals crossed the White House Fence and no Secret Service protectees were ever in any danger," the Secret Service added.

    D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser on Sunday pleaded with residents, "we do not want our city to be destroyed."

    "We certainly recognize and empathize with the outrage that people feel ... and we certainly empathize that the killing of George Floyd wasn’t the first," she said. "Our police, and firefighters, and members of the public safety team for Washington, D.C., along with our federal partners, have been working to make sure people can exercise their First Amendment rights, while not destroying Washington, D.C."

    2 p.m.: 'State of Disaster' declared in Texas

    Texas Gov. Greg Abbott declared a statewide "State of Disaster" amid the protests.

    "Violence against others and the destruction of property is unacceptable and counterproductive," Abbott stressed. "As protests have turned violent in various areas across the state, it is crucial that we maintain order, uphold public safety, and protect against property damage or loss."

    "By authorizing additional federal agents to serve as Texas Peace Officers we will help protect people’s safety while ensuring that peaceful protesters can continue to make their voices heard," he said.

    In Dallas, a curfew will go into effect from 7 p.m. Sunday to 6 a.m. Monday.

    The body of George Floyd, who was a native of Houston, will be returned to the city, Mayor Sylvester Turner said.

    Floyd's family and attorneys have yet to confirm funeral arrangements for the 46-year-old.

    "The focus needs to be on supporting and uplifting his family," Turner said. "And that's what I want to keep bringing this conversation to. George Floyd. It's not about these other individuals, who won't be a moment. It's about George Floyd, and justice for George Floyd."

    The protests over Floyd's death have also gone international, with crowds gathering at U.S. Embassies in Dublin, Berlin and London.

    In London, several hundred people sat in the street outside the embassy on Sunday, The Associated Press reported. The Metropolitan Police said officers were sent to the the scene to engage with those in attendance.

    Five people were arrested: three for violating COVID-19 rules and two for assaulting police, authorities said.

    They were between the ages of 17 and 25, police said, and have been taken into custody.

    Woody Johnson, U.S. ambassador to the United Kingdom, tweeted, "Freedom of Speech and Assembly are cornerstones of a healthy democracy. I thank those peacefully making their views heard today outside the US Embassy in London and the Met police for ensuring everyone’s safety."

    After "multiple public safety incidents and property damage" during protests overnight, Chicago officials on Sunday announced new precautionary measures for the city.

    Access to Chicago's Central Business District and Loop will only be available for people who live in the area, work in the area and who are there to engage in essential activities, the city said.

    Train and bus service will also be suspended for the Loop area "for public safety reasons."

    "Following today's announcement, the City is working closely with the organizers of rallies and protests scheduled to take place within the area this afternoon to provide an alternative, optional route for marches to peacefully and safely return in Chicago," city officials said.

    A citywide curfew is effective from 9 p.m. to 6 a.m. daily until further notice.

    Gov. JB Pritzker said he is activating the Illinois National Guard after a request from the mayor.

    "To those peacefully expressing the pain, fear, and rage of this moment, I hear you," the governor said in a statement. "Your voices matter. We must address the profound injustices in our society and bring about real and meaningful change."

    Denver authorities are looking for a driver who they say hit a police car, severely injuring three officers and a citizen, during Saturday night's protests.

    One officer remains in the hospital but all three are expected to make a full recovery, police said. The condition of the injured citizen was not clear.

    Denver police say they arrested 83 people for curfew violations. Some protesters are facing additional charges for allegedly throwing missiles (any object or substance), damaging property and having prohibited weapons, said police.

    12 p.m.: NYC police cars plow through crowd, mayor calls for investigation

    In New York City, mostly peaceful daytime marches on Saturday turned violent overnight, with people throwing projectiles and torching police cars.

    At least 345 people were arrested, according to police sources.

    At least 33 officers were injured, including some seriously, police sources said, and dozens of police cars were damaged or destroyed.

    But police are also facing criticism after NYPD SUVs drove through a Brooklyn crowd where people were holding a metal barricade.

    There was no loss of life and no major injuries.

    Mayor Bill de Blasio is calling for an investigation which will be led by the city's corporation counsel and Department of Investigation commissioner.

    "There were many things done right by the NYPD," he said, but "there were also mistakes that must be investigated."

    Overall, he said the NYPD demonstrated "tremendous restraint."

    Police Chief Randal Taylor of the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department held a press conference late last night confirming that at least one person has been shot and killed and three more people had been shot throughout the day as protests engulfed the city.

    "Earlier this evening our officers worked to protect our residents' right to peaceful protests. Most of those protesters cooperated and did a fine job. For that, we're thankful. However, there was a small group of people that escalated to violent acts, including throwing projectiles at officers and breaking windows of government buildings," Taylor said. "Since then, we have seen continued and escalating incidents of violence. This includes shots fired and loss of life. This is not acceptable in this community. This behavior will not be tolerated by IMPD."

    "We're asking that residents who do not live in the downtown area go home. Enough is enough. Indianapolis, we are better than this. Downtown is not safe at this time. Residents who do not live in the downtown area, we're asking to please vacate the area," Taylor added.

    The IMPD did not give any further details on the circumstances around the death of the individual involved in the shooting and said that they had "lost count" of the number of reported shots being fired across the city.

    A total of 28 people have been arrested by the Metro Nashville Police Department after the 10 p.m. curfew took effect.

    Earlier in the day, protesters marched down Broadway and 1st Avenue North arriving at 1 Public Square to continue protesting outside of the Metropolitan Nashville Courthouse.

    Protesters could be seen shouting "no peace" and "don't shoot' as they gathered on the steps of Public Square Park.

    Protesters reportedly broke out windows of Metro courthouse and spray-painted obscenities against law enforcement on the walls and sidewalk.

    A group of people also managed to break into the Metro courthouse and set fire to the outside and inside of the building before authorities were able to disperse the crowd using fireworks and a smoke bomb. Protesters could also be seen outside the front of the courthouse burning an American flag.

    Target said Saturday night it will be temporarily closing 175 stores due to ongoing protests.

    Target closed 71 stores in Minnesota; 49 stores in California; four stores in Colorado; two stores in Georgia; seven stores in Illinois; one store in Michigan; five stores in Missouri; 12 stores in New York; one store in Nebraska; eight stores in Oregon; four stores in Pennsylvania; nine stores in Texas; and two stores in Wisconsin.

    Team members impacted by store closures will be paid for up to 14 days of scheduled hours during store closures, including COVID-19 premium pay.

    Atlanta Police have issued a statement saying that they are no longer working any major incidents and the vast majority of protesters have dispersed.

    A total of 70 people have been arrested Saturday night into Sunday morning.

    Ferguson, Missouri, took violent turn when protesters have vandalized the police department.

    Ferguson was the center of civil of unrest in 2014 after the fatal police shooting of Michael Brown, an 18-year-old black man.

    All non-essential personnel were evacuated at the Ferguson Police Department.

    Missouri Governor Mike Parson declared a state of emergency late Saturday and activated the Missouri National Guard to stand ready to assist.

    Two officers were injured and transported to the hospital while two others were treated on the scene for minor injures.

    The Miami-Dade Police Department have announced that 38 people have been arrested so far after Miami-Dade County Mayor Carlos Gimenez signed a local state of emergency declaration, ordering a curfew that took place at 10 p.m. last night until 6 a.m. on Sunday after some protesters began to burn police cars at the Miami Police Station.

    The Department of Transportation and Public Works also has suspended all Miami-Dade Transit services on Sunday, May 31, including Metrorail, Metromover and Metrobus. This decision was made in an abundance of caution, and to ensure the safety of all passengers and employees, according to a statement released by Miami-Dade County.

    12:46 a.m.: Biden releases statement on protests, urges understanding but cautions against 'needless destruction'

    Former vice president Joe Biden released a paper statement just after midnight eastern on the ongoing unrest and protests currently gripping several major American cities, urging an understanding of the trauma many people of color in America are facing in the wake of George Floyd's death, but also speaking out against the "needless destruction," that is playing out as a result of the protests.

    "These last few days have laid bare that we are a nation furious at injustice. Every person of conscience can understand the rawness of the trauma people of color experience in this country, from the daily indignities to the extreme violence, like the horrific killing of George Floyd," Biden wrote.

    "Protesting such brutality is right and necessary. It's an utterly American response. But burning down communities and needless destruction is not. Violence that endangers lives is not. Violence that guts and shutters businesses that serve the community is not," he added.

    The presumptive Democratic nominee also added that the protests going on tonight should not overshadow the cause they are trying to advance.

    "The act of protesting should never be allowed to overshadow the reason we protest. It should not drive people away from the just cause that protest is meant to advance," Biden wrote.

    Biden also acknowledged the widespread pain across the country, not only from the pain of Floyd's death, but from coronavirus as well, relating to the feeling of grief, but implored the country to use the current anger to "compel our nation across this turbulent threshold into the next phase of progress, inclusion, and opportunity for our great democracy."

    "I know that there are people all across this country who are suffering tonight. Suffering the loss of a loved one to intolerable circumstances, like the Floyd family, or to the virus that is still gripping our nation. Suffering economic hardships, whether due to COVID-19 or entrenched inequalities in our system. And I know that a grief that dark and deep may at times feel too heavy to bear," Biden said.

    "I know."

    "And I also know that the only way to bear it is to turn all that anguish to purpose. So tonight, I ask all of America to join me -- not in denying our pain or covering it over-- but using it to compel our nation across this turbulent threshold into the next phase of progress, inclusion, and opportunity for our great democracy."

    "We are a nation in pain, but we must not allow this pain to destroy us. We are a nation enraged, but we cannot allow our rage to consume us. We are a nation exhausted, but we will not allow our exhaustion to defeat us," the statement said.

    Biden also pledged, if elected, to help lead a conversation on the issues that have caused the current unrest, and referenced again his recent conversation with George Floyd's family and a promise he made to ensure his death will not just be a "hashtag."

    "As President, I will help lead this conversation — and more importantly, I will listen. I will keep the commitment I made to George's brother, Philonise, that George will not just be a hashtag. We must and will get to a place where everyone, regardless of race, believes that 'to protect and serve' means to protect and serve them," Biden wrote.

    "Please stay safe. Please take care of each other," he added, ending his statement.

    ABC News' Whitney Lloyd, Aaron Katersky, Jeff Cook, Christine Theodorou, Ahmad Hemingway, Josh Hoyos, Alexandra Faul, Jim Scholz, Marcus Moore, Clayton Sandell, Bonnie McLean, Sarah Shales, Luis Martinez, Jake Date, John Verhovek, Josh Margolin and Ben Jimenez contributed to this report.

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